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Plenary Speakers

Sang Yup Lee KAIST

  • Title Systems metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the production of chemicals and materials from renewable resources and CO2
  • Bio Sang Yup Lee is Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, KAIST. He is also Vice President for Research, Director of BioProcess Engineering Research Center, and Director of Bioinformatics Research Center. He is fellow of Korean Academy of Science and Technology, National Academy of Engineering Korea, American Academy of Microbiology, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, World Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Inventors, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and Society for Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology. He is also International Member of both National Academy of Sciences USA and National Academy of Engineering USA. His research interests include metabolic engineering, industrial biotechnology, synthetic biology, and systems biology.
Plenary abstract

Liang-Shih Fan The Ohio State University

  • Title Novel Chemical Synthesis Pathways based on Chemical Looping Technology with CO2 as a Co-Feedstock
  • Bio L.-S. Fan is Distinguished University Professor and C. John Easton Professor in Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. He has been on the faculty of Chemical Engineering at Ohio State since 1978 and served as Department Chair from 1994 – 2003. Professor Fan received his B.S. (1970) from National Taiwan University, and his M.S. (1973) and Ph.D. (1975) from West Virginia University, all in Chemical Engineering. In addition, he earned an M.S. (1978) in Statistics from Kansas State University. Professor Fan’s expertise is in particle science and technology, multiphase reaction engineering, and energy and environmental systems
Plenary abstract

Tao Zhang Chinese Academy of Sciences

  • Title Single-atom Catalysis toward Efficient CO2 Conversion
  • Bio Tao Zhang received PhD in 1989 from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). After one year in University of Birmingham as a post-doctoral fellow, he joined DICP again in 1990 and was promoted to a full professor in 1995. He was the Director of DICP from 2007-2016 and is now the Vice President of CAS. His research interests are mainly focused on Single-Atom Catalysis,Nano Catalysis, Biomass Conversion, and CO2 Conversion. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed papers and 100 patents. He is the Co-Editor-in-Chief of Chinese Journal of Catalysis since 2014, and Editorial/Advisory Board Members of Applied Catalysis B, ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering,ChemPhysChem, Green Chemistry and Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.
Plenary abstract

Seongjun Lee SK Innovation

  • Title SKI’s efforts on climate crisis
  • Bio CTO of SK Innovation, Head of Institute of Environmental Science & Technology
    Advisory Member of Presidential Advisory Council on Science & Technology, South Korea
    Ph. D., Chemical Engineering, Seoul National University
Plenary abstract

Annemie Bogaerts University of Antwerp

  • Title CO2 conversion by cold plasma: a hot topic!
  • Bio Annemie Bogaerts (female, age 49) obtained her M.Sc. in Chemistry in 1993, and her PhD in sciences in 1996, both from the University of Antwerp (UA). After some postdoc years, she became professor in physical chemistry at the UA in 2003 and is full professor since 2014. She is head of the interdisciplinary research group PLASMANT. She started this group “from scratch” after the retirement of her supervisor in 2004, based on her own PhD research, and gradually expanding the number of researchers and research topics. Currently the group counts ca. 50 members. Her research focuses on a better understanding of plasmas, by means of modeling and experiments, for various applications. The main applications are in green chemistry (conversion of small molecules, like CO2, CH4 and N2, into value-added chemicals and renewable fuels) and plasma medicine.
Plenary abstract

Liang-Shih Fan The Ohio State University

  • Title Novel Chemical Synthesis Pathways based on Chemical Looping Technology with CO2 as a Co-Feedstock

Plenary abstract

The advantages of a chemical looping reducer reactor include the modularization potential that leverages two or more reducer reactors operating in parallel to enhance syngas production beyond what is achievable by a single reducer reactor or conventional processes. The modularized system incorporates CO2 capture and utilization as a feedstock in an iron–titanium composite metal oxide based chemical looping system to enhance coal based chemical production. Simulations conducted in ASPEN Plus software suggest that adopting a cocurrent moving bed reducer reactor based modularization strategy can improve syngas yield by greater than 11% over a single chemical looping reducer reactor. Experiments conducted on a bench scale reducer reactor confirm the findings of the simulations. The modularization simulation was scaled up and incorporated into commercial sized methanol and acetic acid production plants. Chemical looping modularization demonstrates the ability to reduce coal consumption by 25% over a baseline coal gasification process, compared to 15% reduction if a single chemical looping reducer reactor is used instead of the modular strategy, for 10 000 ton per day methanol production. Integration into a commercial scale acetic acid plant shows conditions in which the process can operate as a CO2 neutral or negative system, where the process was consuming more CO2 than it produces. These results indicate the potential for significant feedstock reduction in large-scale coal to chemical processes, like methanol, acetic acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid.

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Sang Yup Lee KAIST

  • Title Systems metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the production of chemicals and materials from renewable resources and CO2

Plenary abstract

Due to the increasing concerns on climate change, bio-based production of chemicals and materials from renewable non-food biomass and CO2 is becoming increasingly important. To efficiently construct microbial cell factories, it is important to perform systems metabolic engineering that integrates traditional metabolic engineering with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering. In this lecture, systems metabolic engineering startegies developed and employed for the development of microbial strains capable of efficiently producing various chemicals and materials will be described. In particular, development of microbial strain capable of efficiently producing succinic acid involving carboxylation will be showcased. Also, the strategies for developing microbial strains capable of growing on CO2 and formic acid as sole carbon sources will be described.

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Tao Zhang Chinese Academy of Sciences

  • Title Single-atom Catalysis toward Efficient CO2 Conversion

Plenary abstract

The intrinsic stableness of CO2, with an extremely high C=O bond energy of 806 kJ mol–1, makes transformation of CO2 to chemicals or fuels very challenging. Simply yet powerfully, single-atom catalysts (SACs) with atomically dispersed metal active centers on supports have witnessed a growing interest in a wide range of catalytic reactions. The state-of-the-art architecture of SACs is exemplified as a bridge to link homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, which has already been demonstrated affordable in a few catalytic processes. The unique structures of SACs are appealing for adsorptive activation of CO2 molecules, transfer of intermediates from support to active metal sites, and production of desirable products in CO2 conversion. In this talk, I will exemplify our recent endeavors in the development of SACs toward CO2 conversions in thermal- and electro- catalysis. In terms of the support not only stabilizing but also working collaboratively with the single active sites, the proper choice of support is of great importance for its stability, activity and selectivity in single atom catalysis. With a set of high-resolution, spectroscopic and in-situ technique characterizations, we disclose the details about the structural geometry of these SACs, and tentatively shed light on how these catalysts work for CO2 transformation. The concept of single-atom catalysis may even help realize the ultimate goal of transforming CO2 into valuable products by using heterogeneous catalysts at mild conditions.

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Seongjun Lee SK Innovation

  • Title SKI’s efforts on climate crisis

Plenary abstract

Global CO2 concentration has increased exponentially since oneset of the industrial revolution, and it has become one of the direct effecting factors on today’s climate crisis. Irreversible climate change has resulted catastrophic crisis, such as surging sea level, extreme flooding and droughts, increasing outbreak of deadly tornados and many others.

Facing the environmental issues which now became immediate and urgent task, businesses in every industry are suffering to tackle the greenhouse gas emissions. Amongest SK Innovation(SKI), Korean Number one energy and chemicals company, seeks the solution in technology. We are focusing on advancing process efficiency and developing high-efficient and high-capacity batteries, which plays a vital role in minimizing CO2 emission. In addition, we are actively developing and promoting R&D collaboration in the environment field, including plastic/battery waste recycling, CCUS(CO2 Capture Utilization & Storage), water treatment and other relevant technology areas.

Last but not least, we certainly don’t believe a single company's effort can achieve the net zero carbon emissions. The collaboration between relevant industries, academia and government administrations is essential. Therefore, SKI looks forward to work with various partners and actively participating in joint responses to climate crisis.

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Annemie Bogaerts University of Antwerp

  • Title CO2 conversion by cold plasma: a hot topic!

Plenary abstract

Plasma-based CO2 conversion is gaining increasing interest. Plasma is an ionized gas, created by applying electricity to a gas. It consists of neutral gas molecules, but also ions, electrons, excited species and various radicals. This chemical cocktail allows thermodynamically difficult reactions, such as CO2 conversion, to proceed at mild conditions, i.e., atmospheric pressure and near room temperature. Indeed, the electrons gain most energy from the applied electric field, and they can activate the gas molecules, without the need of external heating. Moreover, a plasma reactor can be switched on/off immediately, it is very suitable to be combined with fluctuating renewable electricity. However, to improve this application in terms of conversion, energy efficiency and product formation, a good insight in the underlying mechanisms is desirable. We try to obtain this by computer modelling and experiments.
We will first provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art in plasma-based CO2 (and CH4) conversion, with different types of plasma reactors, and compare it with other emerging CO2 conversion technologies. Subsequently, we will present some recent results obtained in our group PLASMANT in this domain, including experiments and modeling for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This includes modeling the plasma chemistry as well as the reactor design improvements, in different types of plasma reactors commonly used for CO2 conversion, i.e., dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), gliding arc (GA) discharges, microwave (MW) plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGDs), as well as demonstrating their performance in the lab.

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